Lyric writing activity third

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Lyric writing activity third

But we know that teaching involves lighting a spark in students that motivates, inspires, and makes them want to learn and achieve. Students who may not connect with a book or article in class just may connect with a popular song they are familiar with when you make it part of instruction.

Once I find a song I think may work, I use the site AZLyrics to search the title of the song so I can read all the lyrics in their entirety.

Close Reading and Listening! Last year I shared how I got my feet wet with close reading in my post, " Investigating Nonfiction Part 2: Digging Deeper with Close Reading.

While I apply many of the same principles I used with nonfiction text to look closely at lyrics, there are a few differences, especially when I get the lesson started.

My favorite part of doing close readings with songs is when my boys and girls realize for the first time that their favorite head-bopping song actually has a story behind it.

(ELL, ESL, and EFL)

The songs they are listening to are really just stories, and the songwriters are authors. The next step is to listen to the song. If you own the song, you could play it off your phone or a CD; I frequently play it off of YouTube, letting my kids hear the sound only.

After listening to the song, my students write down the name of the song in the first column, what they think the song is about in the middle column and what they are wondering or curious about in the last column.

After listening a second time, students complete the next row of the I Hear, Think, Wonder sheet, then talk over their findings with their partner once again. If time allows, they listen a third time. Normally, when the song is played multiple times, my students start listening more carefully, and for the first time, many begin to realize there is more to the song than a catchy beat.

lyric writing activity third

I ask my students what they notice about the lyrics. Using the Close Reading sheet below, my students read through the songs with their reading partners three times. Music, especially music your students are familiar with, makes great text for close reading. My students come to understand listening to a song and even reading through it once does not always equate comprehension, and they quickly realize the value of close reading with their favorite songs so they can appreciate the story behind the song.If time allows, they listen a third time.

Normally, when the song is played multiple times, my students start listening more carefully, and for the first time, many begin to realize there is more to the song than a catchy beat. Activity (Describe the independent activity to reinforce this lesson) Have Class Line Up outside the room and call the class in groups of 4 with 1 "red" student per group.

A "red" student is a student who has caused persistent disruption in the class - usually with other red students. Create New Song Lyrics in 4 Easy Steps: Step 1: Choose a song that is easy to sing and copy the lyrics from the Internet. Step 2: Students listen to .

In this song lyrics activity, students will sing a song about words that begin with the D sound. It is set to the tune of "It's a Small World".

Lyric writing is a form of creative writing that takes words and adds them to a genre of music, to be spoken or sung with a melody, creating a song.

Because lyric writing is considered art. So when you decided to write lyrics you automatically became a music artist, no matter if you earn a living in a music career or not. If you are writing in the first person (I), don't confuse your reader by switching to the second person (you) or third person (he, she, they, it, etc.).

Similarly, if you are using the second person, don't switch to first or third.

Activity 5: Writing New Song Lyrics | Songs and Activities for English Language Learners